BRAND SPANKIN NEW

T-shirts, tank tops, hats, mugs, stickers AND MORE!
We've set up an online store at
http://www.cafepress.com/hellatite where you can get all kinds of cool gear. They print items one by one to order, so no committment for our no-budget club, and we make $2 to $3 per item sold, which will be used for thank you gifts for our leaders and hosts, or for communal expenses such as campsites.



FRIDAY APRIL 2, 2004: Tour of Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI)

RSVP IMMEDIATELY, SPACE LIMITED (geoclub@es.ucsc.edu)! Our host at MBARI is Dr. Jody Webster, a post-doctoral researcher. We'll begin with a slide show overview of current research at MBARI, followed by conversations with principal investigators, researchers, and technicians working on volcanology, oceanography, marine chemistry, geology, and biology in a variety of local and global environments. We'll tour the Test Tanks and AUV lab, and even board MBARI's 117ft research vessel, the Western Flyer. RSVP IMMEDIATELY to geoclub@es.ucsc.edu! Limited to 12 participants.

SATURDAY APRIL 3, 2004: When Tube Worms Ruled the Great Valley: Ancient Cold Seep Deposits and Chemosynthetic Communities in the Panoche Hills

In Egyptian mythology, the goddess of dead things was Amentet. Here at UCSC we have Hilde Schwartz, a taphonomist - she studies the processes of preservation and/or decay that contribute to the fossil record of life. Take a walk on the wild side with the Poleta/Panoche Punisher and explore the strange undersea world of chemosynthetic communities and how marine geology creates the plumbing to supply these strange creatures with life-giving methane. The Panoche seeps system is believed to be among the best preserved and exposed in the world. In addition, the field trip will be attended by a number of academic and professional geoscientists from the Peninsula Geological Society - a great chance for us students to meet folks in our field and see them in action. Download Field Trip Guide with Directions: PANOCHE-FTG.pdf (1.4M)

Our intention is to promote a self-motivated and cooperatively managed organization where anyone of any background can share expertise in a casual and non-discriminatory club dedicated to increasing knowledge of local areas, California geology, and natural awareness through direct field experience and mutual instruction.

Each participant understands the importance of individual responsibility and the desire to have fun while working together in an educational, non-academic environment.



Please propose a field trip! Use our Field Trip Proposal Form (pdf format) and return to Christie Rowe (box in the Earth Science Office or lab: E&MS A109) or just email: crowe@es.ucsc.edu.

HELLATITE Field Club activities are open to all comers. Hike facilitators will generally provide an informational handout. Any field gear, food, water, transportation, and all other possible neccessities are the responsibility of the participant. Event billing will include recommendations of what to bring to an event.

April 2004:

April 12, 2004 (Monday): SAN ANDREAS FAULT DRILLING PROJECT - Parkfield Earthquake Prediction Experiment and the Carrizo Plain
Facilitator:
Dr. Andy Snyder is a researcher studying earthquake hazards at the USGS.
A unique opportunity to get the insider's view of the cutting edge of earthquake science. The SAN ANDREAS FAULT OBSERVATORY AT DEPTH (SAFOD) project is designed to monitor fault processes, detect earthquake precurser phenomena, and fluid activity deep in the strike-slip fault zone. See http://www.icdp-online.de/sites/sanandreas/index/ for more information about SAFOD. Ongoing at Parkfield is the Earthquake Prediction Experiment including very high resolution monitoring of the fault, including deformation, ground tilt, subsurface pressures, and stress distributions. Information about Parkfield Experiment can be found here: http://quake.usgs.gov/research/parkfield/index.html. Other perks include crossing offset bridges and the opportunity to officially enter and exit North America.
Andy at 10am which will require leaving Santa Cruz by 7:30am.
If we have time (and inclination) we can have lunch at the Parkfield Cafe ("Be Here When It Happens!") and maybe even head farther south to the Carrizo Plain, the World Famous exposures of the San Andreas Fault (see pictures at http://www.ca.blm.gov/bakersfield/carrizoplain.html). Unequalled strike-slip geomorphology!
Please RSVP asap if you are interested in this unique opportunity - I'll arrange carpools if you RSVP with your ability to provide or need to acquire a ride.

SATURDAY APRIL 3, 2004: When Tube Worms Ruled the Great Valley: Ancient Cold Seep Deposits and Chemosynthetic Communities in the Panoche Hills In Egyptian mythology, the goddess of dead things was Amentet. Here at UCSC we have Hilde Schwartz, a taphonomist - she studies the processes of preservation and/or decay that contribute to the fossil record of life. Take a walk on the wild side with the Poleta/Panoche Punisher and explore the strange undersea world of chemosynthetic communities and how marine geology creates the plumbing to supply these strange creatures with life-giving methane. The Panoche seeps system is believed to be among the best preserved and exposed in the world. In addition, the field trip will be attended by a number of academic and professional geoscientists from the Peninsula Geological Society - a great chance for us students to meet folks in our field and see them in action. Download Field Trip Guide with Directions: PANOCHE-FTG.pdf (1.4M)

FRIDAY APRIL 2, 2004: Tour of Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) RSVP IMMEDIATELY, SPACE LIMITED (geoclub@es.ucsc.edu)! Our host at MBARI is Dr. Jody Webster, a post-doctoral researcher. We'll begin with a slide show overview of current research at MBARI, followed by conversations with principal investigators, researchers, and technicians working on volcanology, oceanography, marine chemistry, geology, and biology in a variety of local and global environments. We'll tour the Test Tanks and AUV lab, and even board MBARI's 117ft research vessel, the Western Flyer. RSVP IMMEDIATELY to geoclub@es.ucsc.edu! Limited to 12 participants.

May 2003:

ANO NUEVO State Park - Ancient Mammal Paleontology, Recent Human Archeology, and Modern Faulting
Handout on the San Gregorio Fault by Stefano Mazzoni
Field Trip Date: Sunday, May 11, 2003 (Mothers' Day)
Facilitators:
Seth Newsome uses stable isotopes to study the ancient ecology of marine mammals, especially changes through time in populations of seals along the Pacific coast. With his PhD advisor Paul Koch, he's mapped the paleontological and archeological resources of Ano Nuevo for the Park Service. Seth is a direct threat to any lunch or after-trip beverage items you may bring so beware.
Mark Hylkema is the California State Parks archeologist who oversees research at Ano Nuevo, and is the auther of several books on the indiginous people of coastal California.
Stefano Mazzoni received his MS from UCSC Earth Science in 2002 and now works as a research geologist at ExxonMobil's Integrated Clastic Reservoir Project. Stefano's MS research focussed on the San Gregorio Fault Zone, in particular, on physical and chemical changes experienced by rocks within the fault zone. Stefano may be counted on to distribute an extensive stockpile of ExxonMobil-emblazened merchandise, including but not limited to: coffee mugs, magnets, polo shirts, cigar cutters, stadium seats, calculators, keychains, pens, personal planners, notepads, mints, baseball caps, paperweights,...nah just kidding.

April 2003:

BIG SUR Geology and Coastal Evolution
PICTURES FROM THE TRIP
Field Trip Guide
Facilitators:
Greg Stock is a spelunker who studies the uplift rates of land masses like the Sierra Nevada and the way uplift affects the shape of the land and rates of erosion.
Pete Adams studies how waves transfer energy to sea cliffs and how that energy contributes to coastal erosion. He is also known among grad students for rousing campfire renditions of "Gin and Juice".

March 2003:

THE PINNACLES National Monument
Facilitator:
Dr. Ken Cameron, Dr. Bobby Lopez (volcanology, California geology)
Bring: handlens if you've got one, water (1 or 2 liters per person), lunch and afternoon snack, a car or plans to carpool, sunscreen/hat.

February 2003:

PALEOSURF: The Ancient Beaches of Santa Cruz
Field Trip Guide (pdf format)
PICTURES FROM THE TRIP
Saturday 2/1/03, noon - 5pm-ish, meet at Swift and West Cliff, Santa Cruz:
Three stops including meeting place, approx. 3mi walk at last stop.
Facilitators:
Catherine Riihimaki (Geomorphology, Coastal Erosion)
Christie Rowe (Bedrock Geology, Faults and Fluids)

January 2003:

First Informational Meeting.
Thursday 1/30/03, 5:15 pm, E&MS D250:
Introduction, planning of events, slides showcasing upcoming hikes.


PALEOSURF: The Ancient Beaches of Santa Cruz

I don't have pictures from our March, 2003 trip to The Pinnacles but I'd really like to post some if anyone has any, please let me know. I'm happy to scan if necessary.

Geology and Geomorphology of Big Sur



The Peninsula Geological Society sponsors many awesome talks and trips and they're very generous with their field guide materials.

California Council of Geoscience Organizations
Mission: The California Council of Geoscience Organizations advocates the use of sound geologic knowledge and practice by proposing, reviewing,and monitoring statutes, regulations, and public policies.

The Association for Women Geoscientists has an active local chapter.

An awesome collection of field trip guides from the Moss Landing Marine Lab website

The Ventana Wilderness Alliance is a non-profit working to protect the Santa Lucia Mountains of Big Sur. Visit their site for lots of ways you can get involved!



Questions and Comments: Our Webmaster geoclub@es.ucsc.edu is waiting to add you to our email list and answer your comments and questions.